How to choose the best headlights for Dodge Dakota?

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2010 Dodge Dakota ChartBuy Bulb on Amazon
Headlight Bulb High Beam and Low Beam
H13
Center High Mount Stop Light Bulb
921
Brake Light Bulb
3057R
Turn Signal Light Bulb Front
3157A
License Plate Light Bulb
168
License Plate Light Bulb
917
Parking Light Bulb
3157A
Tail Light Bulb
3057R
Turn Signal Light Bulb Rear
3057
Back Up Reverse Light Bulb
3157
Side Marker Light Bulb Front
3157A
Side Marker Light Bulb Rear
168NA
Glove Box Light Bulb
194
Glove Box Light Bulb
7441
Trunk or Cargo Area Light
912
Dome Light Bulb
578
Map Light Bulb
194
Map Light Bulb
7441

The Dodge Dakota is a very popular midsize truck, which in recent years is sold under the Ram moniker. It’s a no-nonsense pickup truck that works great in many conditions, including off-road driving and highway driving. Given the fact that it’s a vehicle that will be driven in a plethora of different conditions, headlight quality is of a big concern.

Keeping the Dakota headlights in shape is of very big importance and that’s why here we will talk on how to replace your broken bulbs with new ones. We will also talk about ways to improve the lighting on your Dakota, both for looks and brighter output. This means that your Dakota will not only look meaner, but it will be much safer in dark conditions.

Dodge Dakota Headlight Bulb Size Chart

How to find the right headlight bulbs for Dodge Dakota?

The Dodge Dakota has been in production from 1987-2011, divided into three generations. This means that every generation has different bulbs used in the headlights and taillights. In order to be perfectly sure which bulb you need, it’s best to check in the owner’s manual, where you can find information on every bulb used. If you don’t have the owner’s manual, you can ask your closest Dodge dealer for the information. Either way, getting the right bulbs is essential, as any other wouldn’t fit.

How to upgrade the headlights on the Dodge Dakota?

The easiest way to keep your headlights brightness at a high level is by always using high-quality bulbs. By high-quality we mean bulbs from reputable manufacturers that are rated at higher peak brightness and longer life. These bulbs are generally cheap and going for even cheaper ones should really not be an option because they will not only have a shorter life, but they are not as bright as the higher-quality ones.

If money is not a concern, HID bulbs are an even better option. These are the same bulbs used in Xenon headlights and they can shine much brighter than normal halogen bulbs. They last longer as well, and somehow make the higher price acceptable. That said, they will not be as powerful as full Xenon headlights, due to the fact that the headlight assembly is not designed for that kind of light.

LED lights have the same problem. They shine the brightest compared to any other bulb, and they even come with options for changing the color temperature and intensity. However, your headlight will not disperse the light of LED bulbs as well, and even though the output will be much brighter, but the light won’t reach as far.

If you go LED, strips or add-on LED daytime lights might give your Dakota more modern appearance. They also help other drivers notice your vehicle better, and they illuminate great at closer distances. That said, these require knowledge of electricity for installation.

The best option is probably aftermarket headlights. These come with a design that works better with new bulbs such as HID and LED bulbs. They also look better from the outside and will give your vehicle a much more modern appearance.

What color temperature of headlight bulbs to choose?

You thought that color temperature doesn’t make a difference? Well, you’d be wrong. There are a variety of different bulbs available, from 3000K to even 9000K. Choosing a color temperature is not as straightforward as you might think. Sure, the colder the bulb, the better it looks on newer vehicles, but it may not work as good in some conditions, like for example fog. Follow the next instructions if you want to choose the right color temperature for your needs:

  • 3000K is the warmest available temperature and should only be used in fog lights.
  • 4300K is “natural white” and is the go-to temperature for halogen headlight bulbs, with slightly warm color output.
  • 5000-6000K is “pure white” and should also be used in headlights. It has cooler output, more akin to ice, which may look more modern.
  • 8000K has a blue tint, almost like an ice blue. It is still a great choice for headlights, especially in dark night conditions.

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